Month: April 2016

San Antonio’s hailstorm most expensive in Texas history

San Antonio’s April 12 hailstorm was one for the record books.

Last week’s storm and its baseball-size hail that shuttered some local businesses and pummeled cars throughout the region has produced $1.36 billion in estimated insured losses so far, making it the costliest hailstorm by dollars in Texas history, according to the Insurance Council of Texas.
San Antonio-based insurance giant USAA processed 16,500 property and 28,000 auto claims from the storm as of midday Wednesday. Losses among all insurers to automobiles in San Antonio are expected to reach $560 million, while damage to homes is expected to approach $800 million, the insurance trade group said. More than 110,000 vehicles were damaged, and thousands of homes suffered roof damage.

The violent storm rained jagged ice chunks that were as large as 4½ inches in diameter for up to 10 minutes in some areas. The state’s most expensive hailstorm was previously claimed by Fort Worth for a 1995 storm that produced an estimated $1.1 billion in damage.

Forth Worth still holds that title if adjusting for inflation. Damage from that storm would have cost $1.6 billion in today’s dollars, the Insurance Council of Texas reported Wednesday.

The most expensive weather event in Texas history was Hurricane Ike in 2008, which produced $13.04 billion in damage.

The hailstorm left a trail of damage across the northern San Antonio, mainly along a path between suburbs Helotes and Kirby. Cars were totaled across the region, including hundreds of luxury vehicles at BMW of San Antonio. The storm sent hail chunks and rain through roofs and skylights in homes, at North Star Mall and at least one H-E-B supermarket.

Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout large swaths of the city. Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther / © 2016 William Luther
Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther
IMAGE 1 OF 35 Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout … more
San Antonio’s April 12 hailstorm was one for the record books.

Last week’s storm and its baseball-size hail that shuttered some local businesses and pummeled cars throughout the region has produced $1.36 billion in estimated insured losses so far, making it the costliest hailstorm by dollars in Texas history, according to the Insurance Council of Texas.
San Antonio-based insurance giant USAA processed 16,500 property and 28,000 auto claims from the storm as of midday Wednesday. Losses among all insurers to automobiles in San Antonio are expected to reach $560 million, while damage to homes is expected to approach $800 million, the insurance trade group said. More than 110,000 vehicles were damaged, and thousands of homes suffered roof damage.

The violent storm rained jagged ice chunks that were as large as 4½ inches in diameter for up to 10 minutes in some areas. The state’s most expensive hailstorm was previously claimed by Fort Worth for a 1995 storm that produced an estimated $1.1 billion in damage.

Forth Worth still holds that title if adjusting for inflation. Damage from that storm would have cost $1.6 billion in today’s dollars, the Insurance Council of Texas reported Wednesday.

The most expensive weather event in Texas history was Hurricane Ike in 2008, which produced $13.04 billion in damage.

The hailstorm left a trail of damage across the northern San Antonio, mainly along a path between suburbs Helotes and Kirby. Cars were totaled across the region, including hundreds of luxury vehicles at BMW of San Antonio. The storm sent hail chunks and rain through roofs and skylights in homes, at North Star Mall and at least one H-E-B supermarket.
“There is some vehicle damage we have not seen before,” said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager. “There are window holes that we normally do not see. The amount and severity of the dents, we haven’t seen in very many cases. Houses have blown windows and other significant damage.”

Allstate Texas has established a Mobile Assessment Center to process auto claims for customers. Adjustors are being sent out to inspect cars that aren’t drivable, said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager.

USAA spokesman Rich Johnson said the company doesn’t know how long claims will continue to roll in from customers. “There’s been a drop off the last couple of days. We have field locations where people are driving in, and we are getting adjustors out to people,” he said.

The insurer, which caters to the military and their families, will be using drones to inspect San Antonio homes for hail damage Friday.

 

Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout large swaths of the city. Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther / © 2016 William Luther
Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther
IMAGE 1 OF 35 Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout … more
San Antonio’s April 12 hailstorm was one for the record books.

Last week’s storm and its baseball-size hail that shuttered some local businesses and pummeled cars throughout the region has produced $1.36 billion in estimated insured losses so far, making it the costliest hailstorm by dollars in Texas history, according to the Insurance Council of Texas.
San Antonio-based insurance giant USAA processed 16,500 property and 28,000 auto claims from the storm as of midday Wednesday. Losses among all insurers to automobiles in San Antonio are expected to reach $560 million, while damage to homes is expected to approach $800 million, the insurance trade group said. More than 110,000 vehicles were damaged, and thousands of homes suffered roof damage.

The violent storm rained jagged ice chunks that were as large as 4½ inches in diameter for up to 10 minutes in some areas. The state’s most expensive hailstorm was previously claimed by Fort Worth for a 1995 storm that produced an estimated $1.1 billion in damage.

Forth Worth still holds that title if adjusting for inflation. Damage from that storm would have cost $1.6 billion in today’s dollars, the Insurance Council of Texas reported Wednesday.

The most expensive weather event in Texas history was Hurricane Ike in 2008, which produced $13.04 billion in damage.

The hailstorm left a trail of damage across the northern San Antonio, mainly along a path between suburbs Helotes and Kirby. Cars were totaled across the region, including hundreds of luxury vehicles at BMW of San Antonio. The storm sent hail chunks and rain through roofs and skylights in homes, at North Star Mall and at least one H-E-B supermarket.
“There is some vehicle damage we have not seen before,” said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager. “There are window holes that we normally do not see. The amount and severity of the dents, we haven’t seen in very many cases. Houses have blown windows and other significant damage.”

Allstate Texas has established a Mobile Assessment Center to process auto claims for customers. Adjustors are being sent out to inspect cars that aren’t drivable, said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager.

USAA spokesman Rich Johnson said the company doesn’t know how long claims will continue to roll in from customers. “There’s been a drop off the last couple of days. We have field locations where people are driving in, and we are getting adjustors out to people,” he said.

The insurer, which caters to the military and their families, will be using drones to inspect San Antonio homes for hail damage Friday.
“We believe UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) can help us serve members after a catastrophe — faster information about damage,” spokesman Roger Wildermuth said in an email. The company already has been doing testing in more rural locations.

Uninsured loses from homeowners and vehicle owners without coverage also were expected to be high, the trade association said. The insured loss estimates were taken from company-projected losses.

The damage won’t immediately translate into higher insurance premiums for San Antonians, said Mark Hanna, spokesman for the Insurance Council of Texas.

“If you look at San Antonio’s history, you’ve been fortunate,” Hanna said. “Insurance companies will look back in a five-to-10-year period, and they will look ahead, as well. They look at a long period to spread the losses over time. No one city would be hit by one event.”

The city suffered lesser hailstorms in 2012 and in 2001, he said.

 

Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout large swaths of the city. Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther / © 2016 William Luther
Photo: William Luther, Staff / William Luther
IMAGE 1 OF 35 Safelite automotive glass repair company employee Erik White remove broken glass Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the company’s I-10 location after a widespread overnight hail storm broke windshields throughout … more
San Antonio’s April 12 hailstorm was one for the record books.

Last week’s storm and its baseball-size hail that shuttered some local businesses and pummeled cars throughout the region has produced $1.36 billion in estimated insured losses so far, making it the costliest hailstorm by dollars in Texas history, according to the Insurance Council of Texas.
San Antonio-based insurance giant USAA processed 16,500 property and 28,000 auto claims from the storm as of midday Wednesday. Losses among all insurers to automobiles in San Antonio are expected to reach $560 million, while damage to homes is expected to approach $800 million, the insurance trade group said. More than 110,000 vehicles were damaged, and thousands of homes suffered roof damage.

The violent storm rained jagged ice chunks that were as large as 4½ inches in diameter for up to 10 minutes in some areas. The state’s most expensive hailstorm was previously claimed by Fort Worth for a 1995 storm that produced an estimated $1.1 billion in damage.

Forth Worth still holds that title if adjusting for inflation. Damage from that storm would have cost $1.6 billion in today’s dollars, the Insurance Council of Texas reported Wednesday.

The most expensive weather event in Texas history was Hurricane Ike in 2008, which produced $13.04 billion in damage.

The hailstorm left a trail of damage across the northern San Antonio, mainly along a path between suburbs Helotes and Kirby. Cars were totaled across the region, including hundreds of luxury vehicles at BMW of San Antonio. The storm sent hail chunks and rain through roofs and skylights in homes, at North Star Mall and at least one H-E-B supermarket.
“There is some vehicle damage we have not seen before,” said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager. “There are window holes that we normally do not see. The amount and severity of the dents, we haven’t seen in very many cases. Houses have blown windows and other significant damage.”

Allstate Texas has established a Mobile Assessment Center to process auto claims for customers. Adjustors are being sent out to inspect cars that aren’t drivable, said Roberto DeLeon, Allstate Texas corporate relations manager.

USAA spokesman Rich Johnson said the company doesn’t know how long claims will continue to roll in from customers. “There’s been a drop off the last couple of days. We have field locations where people are driving in, and we are getting adjustors out to people,” he said.

The insurer, which caters to the military and their families, will be using drones to inspect San Antonio homes for hail damage Friday.
“We believe UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) can help us serve members after a catastrophe — faster information about damage,” spokesman Roger Wildermuth said in an email. The company already has been doing testing in more rural locations.

Uninsured loses from homeowners and vehicle owners without coverage also were expected to be high, the trade association said. The insured loss estimates were taken from company-projected losses.

The damage won’t immediately translate into higher insurance premiums for San Antonians, said Mark Hanna, spokesman for the Insurance Council of Texas.

“If you look at San Antonio’s history, you’ve been fortunate,” Hanna said. “Insurance companies will look back in a five-to-10-year period, and they will look ahead, as well. They look at a long period to spread the losses over time. No one city would be hit by one event.”

The city suffered lesser hailstorms in 2012 and in 2001, he said.
“It’s not like the Dallas-Fort Worth area that gets pounded year after year,” he said, noting that rates are higher there because it’s a tornado area and in the hail belt. “You don’t have to go far in the Dallas-Fort Worth area to find someone who has had two or three new roofs in the last 15 to 20 years. That’s not the case in San Antonio.”

Randall County in the Panhandle, Bell County in Central Texas and Dallas County in North Texas are the state’s three top stormiest counties, according to a report from Allstate Monday. Tarrant County, which includes Fort Worth, is No. 11. Bexar County is No. 14.

The Allstate rankings are based on the highest frequencies of wind, hail and lightning claims from homeowners between 2011 and 2015.

Insurance companies are active on multiple fronts in Texas this week, especially with the flooding in and around Houston.

Hanna said the Insurance Council of Texas is estimating 30,000 Houston-area automobiles have been totaled or rendered useless because of flooding, coming to about $200 million in total auto damage just from vehicles with comprehensive insurance coverage.

The council has not yet seen numbers for Houston-area homeowner’s claims, Hanna said. Homeowner insurance policies do not cover flood damage, but they cover wind and rain and other related damage.

Homeowners with mortgages on houses in flood zones are required by their mortgage companies to buy the separate flood insurance policies, Hanna explained.
dhendricks@express-news.net

31 Days, 31 Ways: TWIA’s Claims Process Gets a Makeover

Throughout the month of August, The Texas Tribune will feature 31 ways Texans’ lives will change come Sept. 1, the date most bills passed by the Legislature — including the dramatically reduced budget — take effect. Check out our story calendar here

Day 17: A flow chart to visualize the new — and complicated — process policyholders with the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association will undergo to claim compensation or dispute coverage if a major storm hits the Texas coast.

Wylie classes canceled after hail storm

WYLIE — A billion-dollar spring in North Texas got even more expensive on Monday as the region once again was in the bullseye for damaging hail.

Icy globes the size of baseballs… even softballs… pelted cars, homes and anything else in their path.

Wylie, about 10 miles east of Plano, was hit hard by the hail storm. The school district in that city canceled Tuesday classes at all 19 campuses.

District spokesman Ian Halperin told News 8 on Monday that crews are finding broken glass, water damage and evidence of damage to rooftop air conditioning units.

We spoke with the district’s superintendent David Vinson Tuesday morning and took a look at some of the damage. He says the schools must be first and foremost safe.

Wylie schools closed because of hail damage

Vinson said they will look and see what can be fixed and cleaned up on the outside of the schools, with windows being the main concern. Many were shattered in the storm.

Crews will also look at mechanical issues like the schools’ air conditioning and electrical systems.

“It’s gonna be a long day,” Vinson said

Halperin said the “safest course of action” was to close the schools so that exhaustive inspections can be made during daylight and any needed repairs can begin.

Countless cars were damaged by the falling ice, and many homeowners reported broken windows and even hail stones penetrating rooftops.

“The back window was just completely shattered through. It was the scariest thing I’ve ever been through,” said Sara Correa, who had her eight-month-old girl Addison in the backseat when the hail started falling.

“She’s getting pelted with hail and glass, and there’s nothing you can do about it,” husband Adrian Correa said.

Addison suffered some scrapes, but was mostly startled. The family took her to the emergency room just in case.

The family was able to move the car into a parking lot with several other damaged vehicles.

Other cars were stranded on the road. Drivers were left to sit in their cars and wait out the hailstorm, which lasted several minutes. One mom said it was the scariest moment of her life.

Tanner Kasper was in his truck when the sky opened up. “I just grabbed my jacket and threw it over my head,” he said, using it as a shield against flying glass.Parts of Montague County near the Oklahoma border were also hard hit by Monday’s storms.

Hail damaged at least a dozen homes in the small community of Sunset, between Fort Worth and Wichita Falls, tearing through siding and breaking windows.

Repairs underway after hailstorm

Vehicles along Highway 287 were also hammered. Police reported that the hail caused at least six accidents, including one that resulted in injuries.

SOFTBALL SIZE HAIL PUMMELS WYLIE

By Joe Reavis

Staff Writer

news@wylienews.com

Softball size hail pummels WylieWylie residents and property owners arose Tuesday morning to survey the damage of a hail storm that pounded town with stones up to softball size.

The storm hit about 6:15 p.m. Monday, leaving broken windows and leaking roofs in its wake.

“We made over 200 responses. There were some minor injuries and just a lot of damage,” Wylie Fire Rescue Chief Brent Parker said. “We had agencies from all across the metroplex helping us make those calls.”

Parker reported that the Public Safety Building sustained “tremendous” damage. Police Det. Nuria Arroyo said that ceilings collapsed throughout the building and that the department will move part of its operations to City Hall until repairs can be made.

Wylie Independent School District cancelled classes for Tuesday as damage was assessed and temporary repairs were made.

Oncor Electric crews were in town early Tuesday restoring power to several areas and Texas Department of Transportation workers were repairing some signal light functions.

The hail that hit Wylie punctured shingles, roof decking and ceilings. Wooden fences were splintered throughout town.

“Hail was coming through the roof and into the living areas,” Anthony Alvizo, 1016 Foxwood, said. “You wouldn’t believe how loud it was.”

Hailstones that pummeled a wide area of Wylie were traveling in excess of 106 miles per hour. The National Severe Storms Laboratory calculates that a stone 3.15 inches in diameter weighs 1.54 pounds and reaches a velocity of 106 mph. Hail that hit Wylie was bigger and was moving faster.

Alvizo reported that 18 solar energy panels on the roof of his house were destroyed, and said that his next door neighbor lost 71 solar panels. On the bright side, the homeowner said the solar panels saved the master bedroom below. Upstairs rooms of the house were all damaged.

“Water was all over the place,” Alvizo said. “It was running down the walls.

In some neighborhoods Tuesday, it was difficult to drive down streets because of congestion created by repair crew trucks. Roofing crews and home repair contractors descended on Wylie at first light.

New Wylie residents Justin and Jacqueline Grayczyk got an early taste of Texas weather after moving here about four months ago from Chicago, Ill.

“We did not expect this to be Texas weather,” Jacqueline said. “Chicago is looking a lot better, but I still love it here.”

The couple was at Home Depot, as were hundreds of other people, Wednesday morning to load up on plywood, lumber and other needed repair materials. Four windows of their house were knocked out and they counted 30 holes in the roof.

North Texas Roofing Contractors Association warns property owners to beware of scams in the wake of the devastating storm. For information on how to select a roofing contractor, go to www.ntrca.com.

Severe storms bring softball-size hail to North Texas; Wylie ISD schools will be closed Tuesday

Once again, North Texas was pounded by damaging hail as spring storms rumbled across the region early Monday evening.

Grayson Singleton, 14, is watched by his brother Benjamin singleton, 13, as he vacuums broken glass from the hail-shattered window of his father's car in Wylie, Texas Monday, April 11, 2016. (John Zak/The Dallas Morning News)Quarter-sized to softball-sized hail was reported as the storm moved southeast from Montague County and into Collin and Rockwall counties, said meteorologist Lamont Bain with the National Weather Service.

The weather service classifies softball-sized hail as 4.5 inches.

Grayson Singleton, 14, is watched by his brother Benjamin singleton, 13, as he vacuums broken glass from the hail-shattered window of his father’s car in Wylie, Texas Monday, April 11, 2016. (John Zak/The Dallas Morning News)
Grayson Singleton, 14, is watched by his brother Benjamin singleton, 13, as he vacuums broken glass from the hail-shattered window of his father’s car in Wylie on Monday. (John Zak/The Dallas Morning News)
Wylie damage

Storm damage at a home on Teakwood Drive in Wylie.  (Cheryl R. Poldrugach/Twitter)Wylie was among the hardest-hit areas Monday with reports of 4.25-inch hail, the weather service reported.

Tuesday classes have been canceled for all Wylie ISD schools.

“Due to the significant storm damage [the district] will not be able to provide a safe learning environment for all students,” the district said in a Facebook post.

The number of storm damage calls to Wylie 911 overwhelmed the system, and the Wylie office of emergency management tweeted: “Please call only if there is a life-threatening emergency. Please b patient.”

Wylie residents Elizabeth Cummings, 45, and her husband were at their home on Teakwood Drive when tennis ball-sized hail flew through their front windows.

Storm damage at a home on Teakwood Drive in Wylie. (Cheryl R. Poldrugach/Twitter)
Storm damage at a home on Teakwood Drive in Wylie. (Courtesy/Cheryl R. Poldrugach)
“It sounded like someone threw baseball bats through the windows,” Cummings said. “Everything started busting and cracking.”

All the windows on the front of their two-story brick home were destroyed, she said.

Cummings said her home had been damaged by storms last month, and an insurance adjuster had inspected the roof for damage last week. She said he had lined up Matt Poldrugach from Regency Roofing and Construction to make the minor repairs.

But when Monday’s hail stopped, Cummings knew she would need more than minor repairs. She said she was in tears as she called Poldrugach for help.

The roofer and his wife, Cheryl, grabbed a case of water, a box of nails and all the roofing supplies they had at their home in north Carrollton and rushed to help in Wylie.

Cheryl Poldrugach said the 15-person roofing crew planned to stay until all the windows at the Cummings’ and their neighbors’ homes had been covered with tarps.

Beyond a few cuts from stray pieces of glass, no one was injured at her home, Cummings said. But glass is littered throughout the house and buried in some furniture.

“There’s nowhere you can walk without shoes,” Cummings said.

The family pitched a 10-person tent in their living room, where they planned to sleep Monday night. Though one bedroom was left untouched by the storm, the Cummingses said they wanted to to be close for the night.

The purple logos are reports of hail across the northern portion of Dallas-Fort Worth. (National Weather Service)
The purple logos are reports of hail across the northern portion of Dallas-Fort Worth. (National Weather Service)
Damage reports

The purple logos are reports of hail across the northern portion of Dallas-Fort Worth. (National Weather Service)Warnings were issued in southern Collin, northeastern Dallas, Rockwall, northern Kaufman and southern Hunt counties. Wind gusts of up to 60 mph were recorded, and Bain said there was a lot of wind-driven hail that caused hail to go horizontally into windows.

On social media, North Texans shared images of damage from the intense wind in areas including Richardson and Frisco.

Though no tornadoes have been reported, the storms prompted sirens to go off, and residents in some areas, including near Lake Tawakoni, were urged to take shelter.

There were reports of 3- and 4-inch hail in Rockwall, and baseball-sized hail in Denton, Collin, Montague and Wise counties.

The Wise County sheriff’s office reported several hail-related injuries along U.S. Highway 287 and County Road 2798. The sheriff’s office said tennis ball-sized hail hit vehicles, and two people were transported to local hospitals for injuries, KXAS-TV (NBC5) reported.

A destroyed trampouline is seen in Wylie, Texas after a storm produced hail, some as big as baseballs, in the area late Monday afternoon, April 11, 2016. (John Zak/The Dallas Morning News)
A destroyed trampoline is seen in Wylie after a storm produced hail, some as big as baseballs, in the area late Monday afternoon. The trampoline was in the backyard of the home at left and flew over the house and landed in the lot next door. (John Zak/The Dallas Morning News)
At 4:37 p.m., the National Weather Service reported, golf ball-sized hail blew out windows near Sunset in Montague County, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Delays, outages

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport was experiencing departure delays of 15 to 30 minutes as of 8:50 p.m. because of the storms, according to FlightAware.

Oncor reported dozens of power outages across the region that affected more than 10,000 people.

Forecast

Wet weather could return Tuesday evening. The clouds will start to dissipate Wednesday, and the end of the week should be sunny and warm, with highs in the 70s through Friday.
Lows for the week are expected in the mid-50s.

Stormy spring

Back-to-back hail storms pounded North Texas in March, piling up a total of $1.1 billion in estimated losses in Dallas-Fort Worth.

Last month, nine tornadoes were confirmed by the National Weather Service’s Fort Worth office in its 46-county region, which includes Dallas, Collin and Rockwall counties. The March average is three.

Staff writers Claire Cardona and Hannah Wise contributed to this report.

Hail in Plano at West Spring Creek Parkway and Chase Oaks Boulevard. (Courtesy/ Sriram Srinivasan)

Source: http://thescoopblog.dallasnews.com/